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CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 8:45am EDT
to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war in the year after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was 1943, a correspondent named eugene burns wrote a very good contemporary book called "then there was one." and that title refer today the fact that at the height of the guadalcanal campaign, which was the most closely-fought air/sea/land campaign in the war, only enterprise remained afloat of our six carriers that had combat in the pacific in 1942. the only other survivor was uss saratoga which sustained heavy battle damage on two occasions and, therefore, missed almost the entirety of that year. so considering that ed stafford wrote a 200,000-word or book about the enterprise, what is it that here 50 years later warrants another one? and i think there's a couple of reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that rotated enterprise during the entire war. but he's told me in a couple of e-mails that he wished he had been able to write a longer book -- and it took him five years
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 4:30pm EDT
was essential to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was early 43 and the correspondent wrote a very good contemporary book that title referred to the fact at the heart of the canal can pay and which was the closely fought campaign in the pacific war enterprise was in our carriers combat in the pacific in 1922 the only other survivor was the uss saratoga which sustained on two occasions and therefore miss to the entirety for that year of years later couple reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that go through the enterprise during the entire war but he's told in a couple of e-mails he wished that they had been able to write a longer book and a road to the cut took him five years to write this one that would include more of the ship's company with with the navy called white hats, the steelers between them and the commission officers and the sheep petty officers who need the ship work and consequently, i wanted to devote a good
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2012 6:00am EDT
at what was going on in the united states. and you can even see this in henry kissinger's memoirs and on historical record and an archives in our archives over here how the negotiator for the north vietnamese would bring this up to kissinger. he would bring up what was going on in congress, was going on in the streets to try to rattle kissinger who would always answer this is beneath me, i'm not going to talk about what's going on in the united states. at any end i i believe that north vietnamese leaders never really relied on negotiations to win the war. they knew that they had to win on their own and it had to be militarily on the ground. thank you. >> several years ago i had the opportunity to travel around the it now for six weeks, about half the time in the north, which is to be the north, about half the time in the south. and in talking with people, my impression was people in the north, very proud of having defeated the united states, the great power. people in the south, very sad that the united states hadn't in some way managed to stay, to keep with economists. is that co
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 10:00am EDT
in a factory, and vanzetti had an odd job after immigrating to the united states and he had started working as a fish vendor. they were ordinary immigrants, but in the united states, they became radicalized of the anarchist leader who advocated violence. but it was ordinary, and i think the fact that they were just too ordinary guys caught in a nightmare that it's part of the reason we are still talking about this today. we think they are there for the grace of god. >> finally, susan tejada come something about your book was april 15th, 1920 you put it in context. it was also the opening day of the boston red sox baseball season, first year without babe ruth. why do you do that, why you put it in the larger context? >> i really hoped to bring their readers and to the story to make it seem real so that the readers might feel they are in the courtroom, they are in the prison and in the death chamber. it's important to make history come alive. >> susan tejada this is your first book right? >> first adult book. >> you've written children's books? what is the name of one? >> i've written childre
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 11:00am EDT
and will be on the other side. it's like we have two separate congresses. not a united states congress, but a very republican congress and fighting for it advantage in fighting to win the next election. that did not happen by accident. it did not happen by accident. i believe in the free enterprise system and i believe in incentives. they work. we have created a political system in which every incentive is to not cooperate and not compromise and not talk to somebody who has different ideas than your own. and you know, that's great. it's great to be pure on your principal. but we are a nation of 310 million people. and we have all different backgrounds and we have all different life experiences and we have different ideas that we feel strongly about. the way a democracy the size has to work. no matter how deeply you feel about one issue or another, at some point, you have to be able to sit down with someone who has a different idea and find where the overlap is, find where you can give a little and get a little and get the bridges built. and get the programs that a constitutional program that gover
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2012 7:45pm EDT
this is going? .. back to birmingham and montgomery. i have one member of the united states state senator i'm going call his name he said to me, john my voting record would be different. sometime you have to brick people to the point, so they can be informed, they can be educate, and be inspired. >> hi. my name is [inaudible] i was on the oat word of d.c. vote. i'm an voting rights activist as the political work. i find it terribly ironic. how many people live in the district of columbia. how many foctds do we have in congress? zero. it's the most frustrating thing in the world. we don't have it here in the district of columbia. >> if it were left up to me if i was a dictators. i would make it happen. >> let's come up with some creative -- you know, by the way, we're honoring julia at the dinner this fall. what can we do? it's the most frustrating thing? >> you have to don't organize and mobilize and don't become frustrated and give up. >> no. we don't give up. >> we need more members, that will stand up and vote for the vote of d.c. that's what we need. organize your friends across the lan
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2012 10:00am EDT
to birmingham to montgomery. at one member of the united states senate from a sudden state. i'm going to call his name. a few years ago he said to me, john, if i'd been on this trip before, voting record would be different. sometimes you have to bring people to the point so they can be informed, they can be educated and be inspired. >> hi, my name is to be that kavner on the board d.c. folk. the voting rights activists as a political work and that senator blair brown eyed. how many people of the district of columbia? on the votes to have a congress? big zero. so what do we do? is most frustrating thing in the world. we do not have a break in the district of columbia. >> you should have it. it was left up to me as a dictator or just make it happen really. [applause] >> let's come up with some creative -- by the way, we are honoring julia bonanno at our annual dinner this fall. [applause] really, what can we do? its most frustrating thing. a >> continue to organize and mobilize and don't become frustrated and give up. >> no, we don't give up. >> we need more members that will stand up and vote
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7